Extend the Summer: Monoi de Tahiti

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Extend your summer and capture the scent of the French Polynesian Islands with Monoi de Tahiti. ‘Monoi’ is an ancient Tahitian word that means  “scented oil”. The gorgeous fragrance comes from the Tahiti’s national flower, Tiaré, also known as the Tahitian Gardenia. When the tiaré flower is infused in traditional Tahitian coconut oil you get the decadent scent and skin savor, Monoi de Tahiti.

The tiaré flowers that are used in Monoi de Tahiti are hand-picked at a very particular stage of their growth, specifically when they are still unopened. The flower portion is placed in refined coconut oil for a minimum of 15 days. This is known as “enfleurage” (flower soaking), a French term used to designate a specific extraction step. According to specific maceration standards set by the decree of Appellation d’Origine, which each manufacturer must scrupulously follow, a minimum of 15 tiaré flowers must be used in every liter of refined coconut oil.

Beyond their contribution to Monoi de Tahiti, tiaré flowers are deeply rooted in everyday Polynesian life. In traditional medicine, the flower is prepared in a variety of concoctions to alleviate headaches, sunburn and even the common cold. It is also known for the benefits to the skin, body and hair, because it does not contain any emulsifiers. The oil moisturizes, protects and conditions skin while combining the beautiful scent of Tahitian gardenia flowers and coconut oil.

Used in many beauty products, the fragrant scent of Monoi perpetually remind me of summer. During the colder months of the year, bring a little sunshine into your life with Monoi.

The Body Shop ~ Spa Wisdom Polynesia Monoi Miracle Oil: $20.00

NARS ~ Monoi Body Glow II: $59.00

Carol’s Daughter ~ Monoi Repairing Hair Mask: $29.00 (FULL REVIEW: HERE)

Monoi Tiki Tahiti ~ Tahitian Coconut Oil: $6.75

C. Booth ~ Tahitian Monoi Dry Oil Spray: $6.99

Posted on August 29, 2012, in Beauty, Hair, Shop, Skincare and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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